Monday, June 19, 2017

Home Remedies We All Love!

     








                                                           Diet Modification :
          If you are allergic to pollens, symptoms may get worse (or you may notice new ones like an itchy mouth) after eating produce that contains proteins similar to those pollens. For instance, apples and cherries cross-react with birch tree pollens. For instance, apples and cherries cross-react with birch tree pollen, bananas, and cucumbers with ragweed. If certain foods trigger a reaction, avoid eating them raw: cooked versions are fine, as heat breaks down the offending proteins.


                                                          Probiotics:
        Studies have shown that boosting the body's friendly bacteria with probiotics (found in supplements or in foods such as yogurt or miso) may help prevent and relieve nasal allergies, possibly by regulating the immune systems' response. Clinical trials haven't determined which strains work best, but studies often use lactobacilli and bifidobacteria strains in doses of 2 billion to 5 billion colony-forming units once or twice daily.


    
          


                                                                       

Monday, June 12, 2017

Motivating The Mind and Waking up the Senses!

 


    Many of us are unaware of our now " Brain Health." There is nothing wrong with evaluating our


memories and asking ourselves questions regarding our thinking patterns. Sometimes even little


things like losing our keys or walking into a room and forgetting why we went there are triggers for


us. I believe many of us have these little "forgetful moments." In the instance that we drive to town


and forget how to get back home that becomes a major red flag for those around us.


     This is when it becomes apparent that our "Brain Health" may need evaluation or that we should


begin to re- think our overall health. Sometimes a simple yearly check-up or revamping our diets and


eating cleaner and greener can wake up our brains and refresh our senses. Just remember new are


never too young or too old to start to think about our "Brain Health."

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Dementia and Alzheimer's Resources







Meeting information:

The second and fourth Tuesdays of each month Touching Hearts Senior Care host a Dementia Support Group meeting for caregivers or anyone interested in  information about the disease. 

Support groups are FREE, however a RSVP is encouraged.

Our support groups are designed to provide educational, emotional and social support for family and friends of individuals living with the disease.  We encourage individuals to share their experiences and ask questions to help develop solutions to their concerns and challenges.

We meet 11 am – 12:00 pm Noon the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of each month.

Location:

Touching Hearts Senior Care

3263 Demetropolis Rd., Ste. 10

Mobile, AL  36693

251-445-4204 - RSVP

Friday, March 17, 2017

SAVE THE DATE!!


 
SAVE THE DATE

DEMENTIA WORKSHOP

APRIL 6, 2017

9am – 12pm

GOODWILL EASTER SEALS

AUDITORIUM

2440 GORDON SMITH DR.

MOBILE, AL  36617

“Legal aspects of Dementia”

“Teepa Snow GEMS”

Google Eventbrite mobile to register or follow the link below:


For more information call Gina @ 251-445-4204

Advertising sponsor, Senior’s Blue Book

Monday, January 23, 2017


The Sound of Music

By Teresa Dumain

NeurologyNow, April/May 2016

 
A playlist of familiar songs can help improve the well-being of people with Alzheimer’s disease

 
The Power of Music

 Personalized music playlists can help promote well-being and enhance quality of life for people with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive impairments, say Daniel C Potts, MD, FAAN, a neurologist at the Tuscaloosa Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Alabama, who witnessed the effect of music on his own father.  When Dr. Potts’ father, who passed away from complications of Alzheimer’s, was in hospice the last few days of his life, he couldn’t respond or speak at all.  “So we just stood around his bedside and sang the old church hymns he grew up with,” he recalls.  “We were amazed when he actually sang with us, or at least mouthed the words.”

To make a playlist for someone you love, follow these tips from the Music & Memory organization.

 Get the gear.  You’ll need a computer or tablet; an iPod or other digital music player; and a pair of lightweight, adjustable, over-the-ear headphones.

Create a song list.  Some digital music players hold up to 300 songs, others more.  Aim for 80 to 100 selections in the beginning.

Focus on familiar music.  Songs from the person’s own young adult years----when he or she was aged 18 to 25----may be the most engaging.  The key is to choose tunes that have positive associations.  Talk to family and friends for ideas, or, if possible, ask the person herself.  What artists or songs did she listen to when she was young?

For more information or help setting up a playlist, visit musicandmemory.org.

Monday, January 16, 2017


Conversation Starter

By Gina Roberts-Grey

NeurologyNow, June, July Issue 2016

 

Maria Shriver started talking about Alzheimer’s disease after her father, Sargent Shriver, was diagnosed.  Ten years later, she’s still talking and people are beginning to pay attention.

 In 2003 she began asking questions, getting answers, and sharing that information with others.  Within a year of her father’s diagnosis, she was bringing those skills to bear on Alzheimer’s disease.

The more she learned, the more she realized she wanted to start a national conversation, one she hoped would translate into more support for people with Alzheimer’s disease and their families.

She started this trend by:

Public Discourse

Raising Awareness and Funds

Detecting A Pattern

A Call To Women

The Female Connection

Advocating Prevention

How to Help

 There’s much to be done to address the Alzheimer’s epidemic, says Shriver.  She offers some suggestions for the federal government in The Shriver Report, including providing an eldercare tax credit, eldercare leave, elder day care programs staffed by professionals trained in dealing with the disease, intergenerational day care centers, quality control of nursing homes and end-of-life facilities----and promoting eldercare savings programs to set aside money for future health care costs.

The government is responding to advocates like Shriver.  The Alzheimer’s Association hopes Congress will increase Alzheimer’s-related funding by $400 million in 2017.  And the proposed 2016 federal budget allocated an additional $350 million for Alzheimer’s disease research, a 60 percent boost that will bring total funding to $936 million.

Thursday, December 29, 2016


YOUR BRAIN ON STORIES      


Prevention Magazine – September 2016

What engages more of your brain than music or math?  University of California, Berkeley, researchers have discovered that it’s storytelling.  Their studies show that listening to story podcasts activated sensations, emotions and memories not on just one side but across the entire brain, thereby upending right brain/left brain theory.

“Understanding a story requires access to all kinds of cognitive processes – social reasoning,  spatial reasoning, emotional responses, visual imagery, and more,” says study author Alex Huth.  The findings may one day help scientists “read” the brains of people who can’t speak due to stroke or disease.